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Posts Tagged ‘Balloon Kyphoplasty

Back Pain, Pain, Spine Surgery, Kyphoplasty Surgery Procedure

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  1. During a kyphoplasty surgery, a small incision is made in the back in the spinal area through which the doctor places a very narrow tube. Using fluoroscopy to guide it to the correct position, the tube creates a path through the back into the fractured area through the pedicle of the involved vertebrae.
  2. Using the X-ray images, the doctor inserts a very special medical balloon through the tube and into the vertebrae area, and then gently and carefully inflates it slowly. As the balloon inflates slowly, it elevates the fracture, returning the pieces to a more normal position. It also compacts the soft inner bone to create a cavity inside the vertebrae.
  3. The balloon then is removed and the doctor uses specially designed instruments under low pressure to fill the cavity with a cement-like material called polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). After being injected, the pasty material hardens quickly, stabilizing the bone.
same as Image:Gray 111 - Vertebral column.png ...

same as Image:Gray 111 – Vertebral column.png but coloured (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Kyphoplasty surgery to treat a fracture from osteoporosis is performed at a hospital under local or general anesthesia. Other possible logistics for a typical kyphoplasty procedure are:

  • The kyphoplasty procedure takes about one hour for each vertebra involved in the surgery
  • Patients will be observed closely in the recovery room immediately following the kyphoplasty procedure
  • Patients may sometimes spend one day in the hospital after the kyphoplasty procedure

 

Patients should not drive until their doctor gives them approval. If they are released the day of the kyphoplasty surgery, they will need to arrange for transportation home from the hospital they should never drive home.

Recovery from Kyphoplasty

Pain relief may be immediate for some patients. In others, elimination or reduction of pain is reported within a few days. At home, patients can and should return to their normal daily activities, although strenuous exertion, such as heavy lifting, should be avoided for at least six weeks.

 

Candidates for Kyphoplasty

Kyphoplasty cannot correct an established deformity of the spine, and certain patients with osteoporosis are not candidates for this treatment. Patients experiencing painful symptoms or spinal deformities from recent osteoporotic compression fractures are likely candidates for kyphoplasty. The procedure should be completed within 8 weeks of when the fracture occurs for the highest probability of restoring height.

Risks and Complications of Kyphoplasty

Some general surgical risks apply to kyphoplasty, including a reaction to anesthesia and infection. Other risks that are specific to the kyphoplasty procedure and vertebroplasty include:

  • Nerve damage or a spinal cord injury from malposition instruments placed in the back
  • Nerve injury or spinal cord compression from leaking of the PMMA into veins or epidural space
  • Allergic reaction to the solution used to see the balloon on the x-ray image as it inflates

Balloon Kyphoplasty

It is not known whether kyphoplasty or vertebroplasty will increase the number of fractures at adjacent levels of the spine. Bench studies on treated bone have shown that inserting PMMA does not change the stiffness of the bone, but human studies have not been done. Osteoporosis is a chronic, progressive disease. As stated earlier, patients who have sustained fractures from osteoporosis are at an increased risk for additional fractures due to the loss of bone strength caused by osteoporosis.

To inquire if your health condition will qualify for this procedure please visit http://www.becomepainfree.com

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